Easy Homemade Crepes

Enjoy homemade crepes, save money, and enjoy la belle vie.

Easy Homemade Crepes

Crepes are a huge part of my memories of France. Whether they were the simple (read: cheap) butter and sugar affairs that I purchased from a street vendor or the savory dinner crepes that I indulged in at Le Roy d’Ys in Poitiers, crepes have always held a special place in my heart.

Stateside, we’ve only sampled those that are sold at farmer’s markets or fairs. Or at home. At $4 each for a farmer’s market crepe, home is the best place for a crepe.

While I haven’t yet experimented in all the savory fillings that I knew in France, we’ve cornered the market when it comes to sweet crepes. My children have an unnatural affinity for Nutella. It’s like they’re French or something.

crepes for breakfast

Saturday morning I whipped up a batch of crepes while the kids set the table. They were channeling their inner francais: tablecloth, candles, confiture d’abricot (apricot jam), sugar, butter, and of course, the aforementioned Nutella.

Two of the kids were out of town which left four children to scarf down a stack of crepes. I think I ate one.

Flat, delicate, egg-like pancakes, crepes are the French equivalent of a pancake or tortillas. Sort of. They come together fairly quickly and just call for a little fancy handling when it comes to cooking and flipping. In France I knew how to flip it.

Crepes make an easy dinner if you fill them with savory things like cheese, cooked meats, ham, or sauteed vegetables. They make an easy dessert if you sweeten them up. They make an easy snack that’s just plain delicious.

les crepesYes, the skinny blond is me. 1993

One of these days I’ll just have to forget about keeping the floors clean and just flip out in my crepe making.

If you’d like to make crepes at home, it’s not too difficult. It’s great if you have a crepe pan, but I use a regular 10″ nonstick skillet and it works out fine.

It’s important to let the batter rest for at least 30 minutes. To save time when you’ve got hungry morning people, blend the batter the night before and store it in the fridge overnight. It’s hard to make folks wait while you fry them all up, but it’s more fulfilling to serve a stack of hot fresh crepes at one time instead of watching them disappear as soon as they’re out of the pan.

And trust me, they will disappear.

 

 

 

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Comments

  1. My mom actually gave me a crepe pan a few years ago, but I’ve never used it. I like the simple buttery kind, but our own years in France have made us Nutella-lovers as well. Thank goodness for the Costco size and price, since the grocery store price is outrageous. Maybe if I use both the skillet and the crepe pan, I could make them faster so they are all still hot when we eat. Hmmm. Kid has a birthday on Monday, perhaps I’ll surprise him for breakfast before he goes to work. Thanks for the idea!

  2. I’ve always been too intimidated to try my hand at crepe-making, but you make it seem so easy, I may just give it a go! :)

  3. I love crepes! My Dad always made the crepes when we were growing up so my Mom could make sausage crepes for dinner. Sausage and cream cheese rolled in crepes with a butter and sour cream glaze over the top. Delicious! I think I need to make crepes again soon.

  4. Hadiyatou Diallo says:

    This recipe is awesome! I had to make crepes as a French assignment and they came out buttery and thin and just a little crispy on the edges, plus they were so yummy! You’re recipe was easy to follow and had great results! thanks :)

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