Spiced Pumpkin Scones are Perfect for Fall

These Spiced Pumpkin Scones are delicious for breakfast with your morning coffee as well as an afternoon snack with tea or milk. 

Pumpkin Scones | Good Cheap Eats

These were a spur-of-the-moment creation, based on a half jar of pumpkin sitting in the fridge just crying to be baked into something delicious. Scones sounded lovely.

And they were.

Scones are one of my favorite baked goods to experiment with. I have folded them into the pages of three of my cookbooks and scattered them here and there across the interwebs. They’re almost a perfect food. Like a cookie and a biscuit all wrapped into one.

Some of my favorite scone recipes:

I might need a scone intervention…. Nah.

These Spiced Pumpkin Scones are always a big hit with my people, especially in the fall when pumpkin and spices are such comfort food. These are delicious for breakfast with your morning coffee as well as an afternoon snack with tea or milk. Cut smaller scones for younger folk; bigger scones for us old people. There are benefits to aging.

How I make these good:

Whenever possible I like to cook with plain old ingredients. While the convenience of mixes and canned sauces is nice, I feel better about feeding my family just real food whenever possible. (Go here for some of my reasons on all that.)

The ingredients list in this recipe is pretty wholesome. No mixes or cans, except for the pumpkin. Be sure to get pumpkin puree, not canned pumpkin pie filling. There’s a difference. I use part whole wheat pastry flour to enrich this recipe. Feel free to use all whole wheat or all unbleached, depending on what works for you. If you use all whole wheat, you may need to add a few extra tablespooons of buttermilk.

Pumpkin Scones | Good Cheap Eats

How I make these cheap:

Here are some of the strategies I use to make this recipe more economical:

  • Do a price comparison. I know that Costco is the best place to buy ingredients in bulk, like butter, and spices, especially when there isn’t a great sale elsewhere. I keep track of prices so that I know who has the best deal where.
  • Stock up on ingredients when they are on sale. For instance, when I see a great price on canned pumpkin, butter or flour, I buy a lot. Hint: this happens often in the fall months, so watch your sales and buy extra when you see a good sale.
  • Bake in bulk. It saves so much time and money to make a big batch of scones and freeze the extras. No need to buy a scone when you head to Starbucks next time. Pack your own. Better yet, make your coffee at home, too, and save a bundle.

Tools I use to make this easy:

I use a food processor like this one to cut in the butter and then transfer those buttery crumbs to a bowl and then mix in the liquid ingredients. You can cut the butter in with a pastry blender or with two knives if you don’t have a food processor. Though honestly, I don’t know what I would do without my food processor. It’s essential for scone making!

Since it’s such a big batch, I also use a large stainless steel bowl, similar to this one, to mix everything together. Large sheet pans are a must as is parchment paper, unless you buy USA sheet pans. You don’t need to grease or line those.

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Pumpkin Scones | Good Cheap Eats

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  1. Hi, these sound delicious! I still have some pumpkin puree in my freezer from last year which needs to be used, so I guess I will be baking some tonight.

  2. shirlene says:

    What canI use in place of ww pastry flour? Looking forward to making these. Thank you!

    • Jessica says:

      Oh, you can just sub more unbleached, all-purpose flour. I just reduce my guilt a little by adding whole wheat pastry flour. 😉

  3. YUM! Can’t wait to try these….I think the can of pumpkin in my pantry is calling my name.

  4. Sherry Perry says:

    Don’t have any pumpkin on hand, but as fall is my favorite season, will be holding on to this as am autumn surprise for the family! Thank you!

  5. ummmm. i don’t think there will be any leftovers to freeze. just sayin. =)

  6. We just discovered scones this year…I usually make mine with chocolate chips, but these sound delicious. For the butter, I usually grate it on the large holes of my cheese grater then work it in.

  7. This is on my list of things to bake when the humidity goes on vacation. Oh, how I miss baking!

  8. wow! we love scones. I am definitely going to have to try those!! thanks so much for sharing!

  9. I CANNOT wait to try these!!!

  10. Corissa Davidson says:

    I’ve never had scones…. These are tempting me to try something new, AND they are PUMPKIN. I have a freezer full still from last fall. 🙂 Thanks so much for sharing.

  11. OK these delicious now how would I convert them to Gluten Free??

  12. using a cheese grater for the butter works good too…..very fast and easy cleanup…..grate right into the bowl on top of dry ingredients then stir up. Can use frozen or refrigerated butter with great results.

  13. I found a recipe for clotted cream, so of course I needed to make scone to go with it. I also had been given a pumpkin last week. So what to do except make pumpkin scones, with clotted cream on top (and then pumpkin butter that I made from the pumpkin I was given 2 weeks ago). I forgot about the cinnamon sugar, but it was still the most delicious treat to enjoy.

  14. What can I use in place of the pastry flour? Cannot find it anywhere. I did make these and enjoyed them. A bit more cake-like rather than crumbly but still good. Might have been whatever flours I used–cannot remember what I exchanged it for—or maybe a mixing flaw? I will try these again, but curious about the flours.

  15. Something for you this time. Corn free baking powder= 2parts cream of tartar to 1 part baking Soda. Combine in air tight jar and use as you would baking powder.

  16. Thank you Jessica. I bought a buttermilk culture several months ago and now make my own buttermilk weekly. I’ve been actively searching for new recipes that use buttermilk. The fact that it’s a scone recipe just makes it even better. I’ll be making these scones tomorrow.

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